Al-Ahram Weekly Online   6 - 12 May 2010
Issue No. 997
Culture
 
Published in Cairo by AL-AHRAM established in 1875

Boutique battlefield

Samia Mehrez, Egypt's Culture Wars: Politics and Practise (paperback edition), Cairo: American University in Cairo Press, 2010

Recently, in an otherwise casual conversation, a writer friend remarked that the Egyptian culture scene was like an oligarchy with no constituency beyond the oligarchs. As agents of what looks like the Victorian age of Arab arts and letters, she elaborated, Egyptian intellectuals are power mongers by default. Many are in the employ of institutions where the production of knowledge is less of an aim than a pretext -- for income and status -- or for preserving the political status quo. But even those who are not, in their isolation from society at large, end up developing delicate networks of interest among themselves; consciously or not, they engage in various forms of hypocrisy or corruption, blocking what creative potential exists apart from them. The result is that the cultural sphere reduces to a set of boutiques corresponding to institutions or cliques, mutually beneficial and unduly exclusive. And that -- so my writer friend concluded -- is because intellectuals rely for their survival not on consumers of culture but on complex systems of patronage and their attendant discourses.

Of course relying on consumers bespeaks unmediated capitalism and so introduces a new set of issues. But it is the readiness of Egypt's Culture Wars to pay attention to the commercially oriented and the popular as well as the "high", the high-brow and the aesthetically pure that justifies its numerous and frequently disparate pursuits. The book respects the cerebral no more than the public or the overtly political, the settings and protagonists of the intellectual fables it presents no less than the hard theoretical plotlines by which they unfold.

Samia Mehrez is aware enough of my friend's line of thinking not to pretend to stand apart from the constraints and confusions of what she is doing even as she writes: her ceaselessly evolving understanding of her own role as a cultural agent occupying a position of privilege and with a vested interest in her subject matter. But what makes Mehrez's all but exhaustive statement on the topic compelling is the way it charts the soap opera-like developments of cultural icons and narratives pitted against society -- and especially the intellectual's vulnerability to dependency and censorship -- in a wide variety of contexts. The novelist Sonallah Ibrahim's life-long refusal to have any dealings with a government- dominated literary establishment, for example -- the implications of this stance for his writing, its reception, and the shifts it has undergone -- is deployed to flesh out the notion of "the disinterested writer" and, more broadly, the theory and practice of engagement in its local modulations since the 1960s. Mehrez uses not only her own knowledge of Ibrahim and his work but also a newspaper column on Ibrahim by his contemporary the novelist Gamal Al-Ghitani, whose approach to the same goals of writerly "honour" and autonomy is markedly different from Ibrahim's. What otherwise might have been a dry discussion of an abstract and frankly overdrawn subject suddenly takes on flesh-and- blood edge.

By juggling straightforward political commitments with bookish frameworks in which they do not always obviously fit -- freedom of expression and gender awareness, for example, with Pierre Bourdieu's notion of literary autonomy -- Mehrez manages, for better or worse, to bring depth to arguably shallow cultural products like Alaa Al-Aswany's phenomenal bestseller, The Yaqoubian Building ; by the same token, she takes purely academic topics -- the family in Egyptian literature of the 1990s, say -- out of the narrow parameters of literary criticism. And the vitality with which she does this, her insistence on weaving in her own experience as both producer and consumer is, more than any theoretical or "intellectual" achievement, what makes Egypt's Culture Wars an important and versatile stroke.

I could argue with Mehrez's claim that "writing in English about the Egyptian cultural field" -- a process, as she puts it, of translation -- "places this local and localized text alongside a larger global one", or at least probe the hows, wheres and whys of this premise. But it seems to me that the distance that same process generates is precisely what makes or breaks each interactive exercise the book proposes, that Mehrez's half- committed standpoint -- the heterogeneous and "postcolonial" pluralism of her approach -- is precisely what hermeneutically enables her work. Like much interdisciplinary north-south scholarship, as it also seems to me, a certain common- sense rationalism, what I might call a pretend objectivity, belies the essentially subjective nature of this undertaking as a whole.

Discussing the attacks to which the American University in Cairo's Naguib Mahfouz Award was subjected as a distorting and negative force in Egyptian literary life, for example, Mehrez employs the spot-on metaphor of the writers' alley: an exclusive space for engagement undermined by foreign -- specifically, American -- intervention. But in so doing she seems to confuse the critic Sayed El-Bahrawy's nationalist tirades against the prize itself with very valid criticisms of who the prize went to. The uproar surrounding its award to the Algerian writer Ahlam Mostaghanmi in 1998 has less to do with Mostaghanmi being a stranger to the writer's alley -- her position as an Algerian or a woman or a newcomer to the literary field -- than it does with the patently poor quality of Mostaghanmi's writing -- almost universally regarded as some of the worst ever produced in the language, whether or not it ended up selling well -- something Mehrez neither brings up nor justifies.

Then again -- and especially where gender is concerned -- Mehrez is unashamedly subjective. "In December 1998 I found myself at the heart of a major crisis surrounding my teaching of the Moroccan writer Mohamed Choukri's controversial autobiographical text Al Khubz al-hafi ( For Bread Alone ) in one of my literature classes at the American University in Cairo," she writes. "The crisis that began on campus as part of a debate over academic freedom and freedom of expression soon took on national, regional and international proportions when the parents of two students sent an unsigned letter to the AUC administration calling for my dismissal and threatening to take me and the university to court." The " khubz crisis", however, is but one spaciotemporal episode on what, grandiloquently but perhaps also ironically, she takes to be a battlefield where the forces of freedom do battle with those of dictatorship, dispossession, power and power abuse in literary-social relations.

Mehrez's notion of right seems to be formulated slightly to the left of the liberal status quo of advanced capitalist societies, in line with her common-sense rationalism and the conditions under which she produced her work. But it is her far-fetchedly holistic accomplishment, the sense of a totality of culture and the totality of a specific culture in a specific sociotemporal space that, more than any sense of right, whether subjective or objective, makes an impression on this reader.

Samia Mehrez, Egypt's Culture Wars: Politics and Practise (paperback edition), Cairo: American University in Cairo Press,

Reviewed by Youssef Rakha

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