Al-Ahram Weekly   Al-Ahram Weekly
25 Nov. - 1 Dec. 1999
Issue No. 457
Published in Cairo by AL-AHRAM established in 1875 Issues navigation Current Issue Previous Issue Back Issues

 
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Talking faith

THE HEAD of the Anglican Church, the Archbishop of Canterbury George Carey, began a two-day visit to Egypt on Tuesday, his second to the country. Carey met with the Imam of Al-Azhar and other Muslim leaders as well as Pope Shenouda III, head of the Coptic Orthodox Church.

Carey's programme included a lecture at Al-Azhar entitled "Dialogue of Understanding." He said the purpose of his visit was to explore ways of encouraging more understanding and mutual respect between the Islamic and Christian faiths.

Sorry strife

CHURCHES across Jerusalem reopened their doors yesterday after a two-day shutdown in protest at the projected construction of a mosque near the Church of the Annunciation in Nazareth, an official with the Latin Patriarchate told Reuters. The official did not rule out further protests.

The issue has fuelled sharp exchanges between the Vatican and Israeli Foreign Minister David Levy, signalling the most serious strain between both sides since diplomatic relations where established in 1994. In a statement issued on Tuesday, the Vatican accused Israel of fomenting division in the holy land and sowing the seeds for future conflicts. Levy lashed back, rejecting the charges and saying they were not true.

Fog lifting

THE OPEN secret of Israel's nuclear arsenal became a little more open yesterday with the publication of excerpts from the closed- trial of Mordechai Vanunu for the first time since he was jailed 13 years ago for spilling atomic secrets. However, the testimony, which theYediot Ahronot newspaper was allowed to publish after petitioning a court, did not reveal many new details of the case.

In his testimony, Vanunu, a former engineer at the Dimona nuclear reactor, said he wanted Israel to stop lying about its nuclear capability and put them under international supervision.

Shimon Peres, prime minister at the time, fumed at the publication and said every country had secrets that should remain hidden. Peres insisted the "suspicion and fog surrounding Israel's nuclear capability are constructive, because they strengthen our deterrent."

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