Al-Ahram Weekly Online   29 December 2011 - 4 January 2012
Issue No. 1078
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Published in Cairo by AL-AHRAM established in 1875

Egypt's longest year
Starting with a euphoric bang, 2011 ends with a whimper: Assem El-Kersh assesses the whys and hows in a year of revolution
Blurred vision
During this revolutionary year, policymakers are partly to blame for a failed economy, Sherine Abdel-Razek reports
Finance 101
Economist Samir Radwan now carries the title of former minister of finance. He came to the ministry during the initial 18 days of the revolution. Although he was at the helm of the Finance Ministry for less than six months, he had the task of preparing the post-revolution budget, that of 2011/12. His choice for the position at the time had caught many by surprise and was criticised due to the fact that his area of expertise had been employment and labour market policies rather than finance. He spoke to Niveen Wahish about the challenges that faced the Egyptian economy in the past year.
Tourism held hostage
The revolution has touched the lives of Egyptians working in various industries. Al-Ahram Weekly listens to some personal accounts
Street vendors thrive
The revolution has touched the lives of Egyptians working in various industries. Al-Ahram Weekly listens to some personal accounts
Year of the Arabs
The Arab Spring brought about the fall of regimes in three Arab countries. But at the regional level and beyond, how deep is the change, asks Amira Howeidy
Libya's ordeal
A look back at Gaddafi's ignominious demise offers an intriguing insight into the dynamics of Libya's 2011 political sandstorm, says Gamal Nkrumah
Intervention or not
In 2011 the Security Council was dominated by military intervention in Libya and non-intervention in Syria, writes Graham Usher at the UN
Damascus deadlock
It's been nearly 10 months since the start of protests in Syria, but the regime still believes it can quash the uprising by brute force, writes Bassel Oudat in Damascus
Just another Palestinian year
Israeli settlement expansion continued to annul any chances of peace, while the 2011 Arab Spring buoyed Palestinian hopes, at least for a while, writes Khaled Amayreh in Ramallah
Time of changefor Hamas
The prisoner exchange deal capped developments pushing Hamas in Gaza towards reconciliation with Fatah and integration -- with consequences -- into the wider Arab order, writes Saleh Al-Naami
Yemen's torturous travail
Nasser Arrabyee takes the pulse of the street in Sanaa
Tunisia's spring continues
A year after Tunisian fruit-seller Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire and triggered popular uprisings across the Arab world, popular expectations continue to run high, writes Mourad Teyeb in Tunis
A bleak end in Iraq
Yearend atrocities and ongoing political turmoil have raised concerns that the Americans may now have programmed the final collapse of Iraq, writes Salah Nasrawi
Sudan divided and bitter
The year brought little cheer to Sudanese, north or south, says Asmaa El-Husseini
Iran and the Islamist Spring
Yes, that's what the mainstream in Tehran call it, though it seems to be inspiring both camps there, notes Amani Maged in Tehran
The year that shook the world
2011 is already history and will remain a historical turning point in international affairs, enthuses Eric Walberg
Yen and Yuan
Harbingers of hope, but BRICS's journey from beggary to bounteousness has not always been smooth, cautions Gamal Nkrumah
A year of revolutionary theatre
Nehad Selaiha gives a bird's eye view of the Egyptian theatre scene in 2011
True, passionate and popular
The January Revolution has had a dramatic influence on Egyptian musicians and songwriters this year. Amira El-Noshokaty reviews a handful of revolution-inspired bands, while Sara Mourad asks people in Tahrir Square what they really feel about the new genre
Songs of revival
The January Revolution has had a dramatic influence on Egyptian musicians and songwriters this year. Amira El-Noshokaty reviews a handful of revolution-inspired bands, while Sara Mourad asks people in Tahrir Square what they really feel about the new genre
The many faces of revolutionary art
Vinous Fouad takes an overview of an amazing and inspirational year on the Egyptian art scene
Tie the knot the Tahrir way
The 25 January Revolution has affected many couples' relationships, with some wanting to give their wedding a Tahrir flavour, says Omneya Yousry
Football flop but Egypt on top
The Egyptian revolution caused long stoppages in training and unprecedented general disruption, ultimately leading to some predictable breakdowns, especially in soccer. But the uprising also made some athletes more determined than ever, none more so than in the Arab Games. Al-Ahram Weekly' s sports team reviews the past 12 months of upheaval and its results
Egypt

From downtown Cairo to Wall Street, the buzzword was 'Protest'. Whether against despots, corruption or economic hardships, anger drove people to the streets in Tunisia -- which started it all -- soon to be followed by mass demonstrations and confrontations in Egypt, Bahrain, Libya, Yemen and Syria. No one was immune to the sweeping syndrome. Major Western cities like New York, London, Athens and Rome also felt the heat...
--caption--

The challenges ahead
By Khaled Dawoud
Unrevolutionary pace
By Assem El-Kersh
Back from the cold
By Dina Ezzat
Hats in the ring
Doaa El-Bey
The real questions for Egypt
By Ezzat Ibrahim
From Tahrir with love
By Nesmahar Sayed

 

 

 

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